Oct 242014
 

Closed for public comment.  This plan element was open for public comment through November 20, 2014.

Artists and artisans flourish in the region, producing glassware, pottery, prints, and fine furniture.  Microbrews, ski trails, fall foliage, maple syrup, and great cheeses all really do exist here. Many of these local products and businesses contribute to our region’s sustainability by using local ingredients and utilizing the area’s farm and forest land.  But ECV is not just a picture-perfect postcard. Click here for full Economic Development plan element.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 12:47 pm on October 24, 2014
Aug 252014
 

East Central Vermont: What We Want

Reducing Energy Use in the Built Environment Plan Element

Excerpt: Energy use in East Central Vermont (ECV), like all of Vermont, continues to be a major challenge in the pursuit of a sustainable future. Nationwide concern about oil dependence has grown since the 1970s oil and energy crises.  Read More . . .

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 4:49 pm on August 25, 2014
Aug 222014
 

East Central Vermont: What We Want

Regional Transportation Plan Element

Excerpt: For too long, rural transportation planning has been directed at “effect management.” Management this way is based on the assumption that professionals must simply calculate the anticipated growth in traffic and then decide how the transportation network should be built to meet capacity.   Read More . . .

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 10:11 am on August 22, 2014
Aug 222014
 

East Central Vermont: What We Want

Our Homes Plan Element

Excerpt: Housing plays a vital role in changing people’s lives and communities.1 Many of our areas are residential in nature and serve as bedroom communities to a few regional job centers.2 Because our job centers tend to lack housing that is affordable for a wide spectrum of people, those who can least afford housing often live the farthest away from where they work. This has led to an environmentally and financially unsustainable commuting pattern and placed additional strain on disposable income, which, in turn, stifles economic growth.  Read More . . .

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 9:03 am on August 22, 2014
Feb 202014
 

The information and resources in this Guide were compiled to help Vermonters, cost-effectively reduce residential energy use, save money and increase home comfort.  The discussion of energy-saving programs, materials, resources, procedures, and tips for Upper Valley homeowners is broken into eight sectors relating to energy use, outlined in the Table of Contents below: building envelope, heating, cooling, ventilation and air distribution, lighting, appliances and electronics, water heating and water-use conservation and food.

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 10:22 am on February 20, 2014
Feb 072014
 

ECV: What We Want

Public Comment Period Closed March 11, 2014

Many of our communities are residential in nature and serve as bedroom communities to a few regional job centers. Because our job centers tend to lack housing that is affordable for a wide spectrum of people, those who can least afford it often live the furthest away. This has led to an environmentally and financially unsustainable commuting pattern and placed additional strain on disposable income which in turn stifles economic growth.

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 10:08 am on February 7, 2014
Feb 072014
 

ECV: What We Want

Public comment period closed March 11, 2014.

Overall, the state of Vermont is approximately 80% forestland.2 The East Central Vermont Region (ECV) is very similar, also showing approximately 80% forestland.  However, the Region is by no means a simple arrangement of four-fifths forest monocultures and one-fifth commercial, industrial and residential land.  But rather, it is a patchwork of villages, rural residential areas, commercial and industrial areas, working landscapes, forest types and successional stages.

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 9:57 am on February 7, 2014
Jan 312014
 

Equity and access to opportunity are critical underpinnings of the Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant program. Grantees are creating a more inclusive conversation on regional issues, with a particular emphasis on engaging those who have traditionally been marginalized from the community planning process. A way to determine if these disparities exist and address them is the Fair Housing and Equity Assessment (FHEA), which program participants are required to complete.

Parameters for producing a FHEA are defined by HUD.

Public Comment Closed on June 7, 2013.

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 2:23 pm on January 31, 2014
Jan 302014
 

ECV: What We Want

Public comment period closed March 11, 2014.

The accumulation of our past actions has already brought us a certain amount of change. This chapter of the plan centers around actions we can take to be resilient to these changes that we can anticipate will occur under the best scenario, as well as additional adaptation actions prudent in the face of continued emissions, which would only worsen effects.

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 12:56 pm on January 30, 2014
Jan 282014
 

ECV: What We Want

Public comment period closed March 11, 2014.

Like the rest of Vermont, the East Central Vermont Region is a cold place for half the year, consequently, we heat our homes a lot, and generally use fuel oil to do so.  Less than 8% of housing in the US is heated with oil, but in our region almost half (48%) use oil to heat. If our houses were newer construction, this would not be so bad, but the region’s housing stock is old, the percent of all units built before 1939 is double the national average.  Work needs to be done to assist as much as possible with community efforts to ramp up conservation and efficiency measures, as well as the use of renewables.

To that end, working with a group of interested residents from across the region, we have developed the following goals, policies and actions.  We welcome your input and comments. 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedIn
 Posted by at 3:42 pm on January 28, 2014